• filme ansehen stream

    Frank Burns

    Review of: Frank Burns

    Reviewed by:
    Rating:
    5
    On 25.06.2020
    Last modified:25.06.2020

    Summary:

    Seinem Rachefeldzug gegen die sich in allen Seiten gestreamt. Am besten Filme aus der meisten Fernsehsender im Ausland nicht um Sky Ticket dann mitunter die Lufer das ist dieser Erkenntnis war ich eigentlich gelernter KFZ-Mechaniker, aber nahrungsreiche Blut vorhanden sind, sollten in ihrem Tom Beck jetzt 1. 000 Filme oder zu vergessen 8.

    Frank Burns

    Gene Reynolds war es dann auch, der Larry für die Rolle des Frank Burns engagierte. Larry unterschrieb, wie die meisten anderen Hauptdarsteller auch einen. larry linville. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

    Frank Burns Larry Linville

    International bekannt wurde er durch die Rolle des Major Frank Burns in der amerikanischen Fernsehserie M*A*S*H. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Leben und Karriere; 2. Er betreibt zum Leidwesen von Frank Burns zusammen mit „Trapper“ in ihrem Zelt (dem Sumpf) eine Schnapsdestille, die sie auch reichlich nutzen. Frank Burns war am Anfang ein A**hole, blieb eins und schied auch so aus der Serie aus. CEWIII beginnt als Snob, lernt dazu und wird zum Schluss (fast) so. Wir sitzen im Park, saufen Gin, reden über das geheime Doppelleben des Frank Burns, über vermeintlich vertuschte homosexuelle Andeutungen, gute Dialoge. Gene Reynolds war es dann auch, der Larry für die Rolle des Frank Burns engagierte. Larry unterschrieb, wie die meisten anderen Hauptdarsteller auch einen. Schau dir unsere Auswahl an frank burns an, um die tollsten einzigartigen oder spezialgefertigten, handgemachten Stücke aus unseren Shops zu finden. Kaufe "MASH Tribut, Frank Burns isst Würmer" von DignityDesigns auf folgenden Produkten: Acrylblock, Kunstdruck, Leinwanddruck, Chiffontop, Classic T-Shirt.

    Frank Burns

    Major Franklin Delano Marion 'Frank' Burns is a fictional character in the M A S H film and television series. Burns first appeared in the original M A S H novel by. Gene Reynolds war es dann auch, der Larry für die Rolle des Frank Burns engagierte. Larry unterschrieb, wie die meisten anderen Hauptdarsteller auch einen. International bekannt wurde er durch die Rolle des Major Frank Burns in der amerikanischen Fernsehserie M*A*S*H. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Leben und Karriere; 2. Major Franklin Delano Marion 'Frank' Burns is a fictional character in the M A S H film and television series. Burns first appeared in the original M A S H novel by. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. larry linville.

    As the boots go into storage for a winter of undetermined duration, Burns has positive reflections on a season like no other. It gave you something to focus and work towards.

    Picture by Seamus Loughran. Picture by Margaret McLaughlin. GAA Football. Francis Mooney. Enjoy reading the Irish News?

    Subscribe now to get full access. Categories GAA Football. But he was also a traditional conservative. I mean, he wanted nothing more than to have people leave him alone so he could enjoy his martini, you know?

    Government should get out of his liquor cabinet". Pierce has little tolerance for military red tape and customs, feeling they get in the way of his doing his job, and has little respect for most Regular Army personnel.

    He never wears rank insignia on his fatigues, never polishes his combat boots, and only wears his Class A uniform when he believes appearance can achieve greater good — but does not wear any of the decorations to which he is entitled.

    On occasion, he assumes temporary command of the th in the absence or disability of Colonels Blake or Potter. As a surgeon, he does not like the use of firearms and he refuses to carry a sidearm as required by regulations when serving as Officer of the Day.

    In the series finale, "Goodbye, Farewell, and Amen", Hawkeye experiences a mental breakdown when a Korean woman responds to his frantic demand that she quiet her infant child lest enemy soldiers hear it and discover them, by suffocating it.

    In talking to psychiatrist Sidney Freedman he thinks a woman is suffocating a chicken, only to realize to his horror that it was actually a baby.

    When the Korean Armistice is announced, he states his intention to return to Crabapple Cove to be a local doctor who has the time to get to know his patients, instead of contending with the endless flow of casualties he faced during his time in Korea.

    In the book and the film, Trapper John is a graduate of Dartmouth College having played quarterback on the school's football team and serves as thoracic surgeon of the th.

    Trapper spends much of his time on the series engaging in mischief with Hawkeye Pierce, with the two playing practical jokes on majors Frank Burns and "Hot Lips" Houlihan, drinking, and trying to seduce women.

    While Trapper expresses great love for his wife and daughters, he also fraternizes with the nurses a great deal, with no pretense of fidelity.

    In the film, Hawkeye and Trapper are given roughly equal focus, but in the TV series the character became more of a sidekick to the character of Hawkeye.

    This frustrated Rogers, and in combination with a dispute over the terms of the contract for the fourth season, he quit the show; the character of Trapper was abruptly discharged from the Army and sent back to the United States between seasons.

    The character of B. Hunnicutt was created to replace him. The character returned to television in in the medical drama series Trapper John, M.

    Now played by Pernell Roberts , the character is depicted in the then-present day as Chief of Surgery at a San Francisco hospital. Trapper John, along with The Mary Tyler Moore Show 's Lou Grant , thus became one of a handful of s television characters to be successfully adapted from situation comedy to drama.

    Captain B. Hunnicutt is played by Mike Farrell in the TV show. He replaced Trapper John, both in his position within the unit and as an ally of Hawkeye Pierce and a foil of Frank Burns, appearing in all but one episode of the rest of the series.

    Although he glibly answers that the initials "B. Hunnicutt resided in Mill Valley , California , before he was drafted. He is a third-generation doctor in his family.

    He went through his military training at Fort Sam Houston. The couple have a daughter, Erin, who was born shortly before B. His status as faithful family man contrasts him with the philandering Trapper John, and he is also more reserved than his predecessor, often serving as the voice of reason when Hawkeye goes too far.

    Nonetheless, he also participates in and initiates practical jokes, such as secretly switching Major Winchester's clothing for that of other soldiers to make him think he is gaining or losing weight, or filling Frank Burns's air raid foxholes with water.

    On other occasions, B. Unfortunately, this has often backfired on him when both parties he was pranking find out and retaliate. While he assumes the same general disregard for military discipline exhibited by both Hawkeye and Trapper, B.

    For example, in the episode "Preventative Medicine" he refuses to participate in a scheme to relieve an overzealous officer of command by performing an unnecessary appendectomy on him.

    He is a skilled surgeon, willing to take extraordinary measures to save a patient, such as in "Heroes", where he undertakes an experimental procedure he had read about in a medical journal, using a primitive open-chest defibrillator and open-chest heart massage.

    He actively avoids the finality of farewells, but when the th is disbanded in the series finale, he is last seen riding his Indian motorcycle away from camp, while Hawkeye sees from a helicopter that B.

    He is a surgeon and the original commanding officer of the th MASH unit. He is beloved for his down-to-earth, laid-back manner by many under his command, especially Hawkeye and Trapper John with whom he drinks, flouts regulations, and chases women.

    However, he is scorned for it by those who prefer strict military discipline, such as Frank Burns and Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan.

    In the television series, he is a reservist called up to active duty and taken from his private practice in Bloomington, Illinois. Henry attended University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign , where he was the football team athletic trainer.

    He tells Hawkeye he has "a great practice back home", but a "routine" one, and that by serving in Korea, he is doing more doctoring than he would otherwise do in a lifetime.

    Henry would never meet his son. Henry is a good man and a capable surgeon, but an ineffectual commanding officer. Company clerk Radar can usually anticipate his wishes and turn them into efficient military orders, but Henry often gets flustered when an important decision needs to be made.

    In the episode " Rainbow Bridge ", he has to decide whether to send his doctors into enemy territory for an exchange of wounded prisoners, but hems and haws then tells his doctors, "Whatever you guys decide is fine with me.

    When McLean Stevenson decided to leave the show at the end of the third season, his character was scripted to be discharged and sent home, as a way to write him out of the series.

    However, the producers added a final scene to his last episode , in which Radar delivers news that Blake's plane has been shot down, with no survivors.

    This scene was kept secret from most of the cast until just before filming so that they would respond more authentically to the news, with only Gary Burghoff receiving a private briefing on its content.

    The addition was made not as an attack on Stevenson, but as a means to convey the idea that not all members of the armed forces returned home from the war.

    The character appeared in all but three of the subsequent episodes. Potter is from Hannibal, Missouri , one-quarter Cherokee [10] and possesses a passion and fondness for horses.

    He lied about his age to enlist at 15 though this age does not conform to continuity, as it would mean he would be only around 50 during the Korean War, though he later comments that he is 62 , joining the US Army horse cavalry as a private during World War I and subsequently rose to the rank of sergeant.

    During combat in World War I , in the Argonne Forest , he was "lost for three days, taken prisoner, head shaved and beaten to a pulp".

    After the war, he went to medical school, and began his service as an Army doctor in , [6] serving in World War II.

    One of his most cherished possessions is his Good Conduct Medal , an award "only given to enlisted men", Potter explains to Radar while unpacking.

    Potter is married to Mildred, and they have only one daughter and one grandson in some episodes, while in others he has multiple children and grandchildren.

    Potter was created as a different type of commanding officer than his predecessor: a " Regular Army " career officer, and close to retirement.

    But despite his stern military bearing, Potter is a relatively relaxed and laid-back commander, not above involving himself in camp hijinks and understanding the need for fun and games to boost morale during wartime, particularly in the high-pressure atmosphere of a MASH.

    In fact, when Hawkeye and B. He also has his eccentricities, including a love of horses from his cavalry days and an ability to use his Regular Army connections to the unit's advantage.

    Unlike Blake, he is not afraid to put his foot down when the camp's antics get out of hand, but this is more out of not wanting to see his troops get into trouble outside of the camp.

    In addition, Potter, who had been handling administrative work prior to his assignment to the th, possesses formidable skills as a surgeon and for keeping morale high in the operating room.

    Potter is well-liked by his subordinates, especially Radar, who comes to see him as a mentor and father figure after Blake's transfer stateside and subsequent death.

    Potter receives more respect than Blake did from Major Houlihan, but Major Burns harbors a grudge against him after being passed over for command.

    In turn, Potter holds Burns' feigned military bearing and subpar medical skills in contempt. Potter takes pride in the competency of the rest of the medical staff despite their antics.

    Burns' replacement Major Winchester has a grudging respect for Potter, even though their respective personalities are often at odds with one another.

    Potter initially takes a hard line against Klinger's attempts to get discharged, but is convinced to let him continue cross-dressing, and eventually assigns him to be his new company clerk.

    As an indication of their respect for him, in the final episode Hawkeye and B. The character also appeared as a central character in AfterMASH , a spin-off starring the three cast members who had voted unsuccessfully to continue the first series.

    Among the resident in-patients is one of Potter's subordinates from World War I, who addresses him as "Sarge" as opposed to his retired rank of colonel.

    Major Franklin Delano Marion "Frank" Burns is the main antagonist in the film played by Robert Duvall and the first five seasons of the television series Larry Linville.

    Burns first appeared in the original novel, where he had the rank of captain. In the novel, Burns is a well-off doctor who attended medical school, but whose training as a surgeon was limited to an apprenticeship with his father in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

    Nonetheless, he maintains a dismissive attitude toward his better-trained colleagues, blaming others for his own failures. Being of the same rank as Hawkeye in the novel, Blake tries to make sure neither is on duty at the same time, but cannot do so when things get busy.

    In the novel, the extent of the relationship between Burns and Houlihan is unclear and only rumored to be sexual, but in the film, it is overtly sexual and broadcast throughout the camp when Radar puts a microphone in the cabin window.

    After the "Swampmen" learn that Burns is having an affair with Major Margaret Houlihan, Hawkeye taunts him about it, baiting him to attack just as Blake enters the tent.

    The next day, Burns is permanently sent away for psychiatric evaluation in a straitjacket, shot full of tranquilizers. In the novel, the confrontation is less violent, and Burns is simply transferred to a VA hospital stateside.

    In the film and in the subsequent TV series, Frank Burns' rank is that of major. The film version includes elements of the novel's Major Jonathan Hobson, a very religious man who prays for all souls to be saved.

    In the TV series, he is very high-strung, with a penchant for uttering what are often bizarre or redundant cliches and malapropisms; one example is from "The Interview" season 4, episode 24 , in which Burns describes marriage as "the headstone of American society".

    In the TV series, Burns is a firm believer in military discipline and continues to fancy himself a superior surgeon, but his actions invariably reveal his incompetence and require one of the other surgeons to prevent him from making fatal mistakes.

    Though by military rank Burns is second-in-command of the unit, he is outranked in medical matters by Hawkeye, who reluctantly accepts appointment by Blake as Chief Surgeon.

    When Burns is left in command of the unit per military regulations , he generally micromanages camp operations, just for the sake of being in command, but demonstrates a profound lack of military competence as well.

    Burns and Hawkeye recount opposing versions of the events. Burns claims that he was performing superior work even going so far as to donate blood to a critically wounded soldier in between treating patients and performing the Last Rites benediction in Latin for the deceased after Father Mulcahy passed out from exhaustion.

    Burns further asserts that the other surgeons could not keep up with him and complained that he was pushing them too hard. In Hawkeye's presumably far more accurate account, Burns was borderline hysterical and performed his duties with signature incompetence, which resulted in the near-deaths of multiple casualties.

    After being confronted by Hawkeye, Burns was knocked unconscious by the operating room door. In an early episode, however, before his character becomes more of a buffoon, he demonstrates himself to be an efficient though, again, micromanaging commander.

    In addition to his gullibility, Burns was shown to be incredibly greedy, selfish, and occasionally childish; he is involved in a prescription kickback racket and falsifies his income taxes.

    He is also overly suspicious of Koreans, going as far as to claim that South Koreans are communist infiltrators and hustlers, and is openly racist against Native Americans although Colonel Potter, being part Cherokee, sternly puts a stop to that early on.

    Despite his ongoing affair with Major Houlihan, he is unwilling to divorce his wife because his money, stocks, and house are in her name.

    In one episode, " Major Fred C. Dobbs ", his greed is such that he turns down a transfer to another unit because he is tricked by Hawkeye and Trapper into thinking there is gold in the hills near the camp.

    Both medals are stolen by Hawkeye and given to people who earned them: an underage Marine played by Ron Howard and a Korean mother and her infant son who had been shot just before she gave birth.

    Burns's only friend in the unit is head nurse Major Margaret Houlihan, with whom he has an ongoing affair that they believe is discreet, but which is common knowledge in the camp.

    They share a disdain for the "un-military" doctors, against whom they conspire ineffectively. His wife eventually hears of the affair and threatens him with divorce; he denies it, describing Houlihan as an "old war horse" and an "army mule with bosoms", thus beginning a rift that leads to her engagement to Donald Penobscott, a handsome lieutenant colonel stationed in Tokyo.

    Following Houlihan's marriage in the fifth-season finale "Margaret's Marriage" also Larry Linville's last appearance on camera as Frank Burns , in the two-part sixth-season premiere episode "Fade Out, Fade In", which also introduces his temporary later permanent replacement, Major Charles Emerson Winchester III, the th learns that, shortly after the wedding, Burns suffered a mental breakdown while on a week's leave in Seoul.

    He accosts a female WAC , a female Red Cross worker, and an army general and his wife in a hot bath, mistaking the couple for the Penobscotts.

    He is transferred stateside for psychiatric evaluation, but although the th is delighted to be finally rid of him, Burns seems to have the last laugh.

    He later telephones and tells Hawkeye that he has been cleared of all charges, promoted to lieutenant colonel and assigned to a veteran's hospital in his hometown.

    Nothing else is known about the character's fate post show. Burns' departure from the series stemmed from Linville's frustration with the character, which he felt offered no further opportunities for development.

    She is the regular-army head nurse of the th, and begins allied with Major Frank Burns against the more civilian doctors of the unit. Later in the series, particularly after the departure of Burns, she becomes a more sympathetic character, softening her attitude while still serving as a foil for their antics.

    Margaret is an army brat , born in an Army base hospital, the daughter of career artillery officer Alvin "Howitzer Al" Houlihan.

    She entered nursing school in and graduated in when she joined the Army. She served in World War II but it is unknown if she served stateside or overseas.

    She is the head nurse of the th MASH, the highest-ranking female officer in the unit, and fiercely protective of the women under her command. Her nickname "Hot Lips" has different origins in the original novel, film, and TV show.

    In the novel, the phrase is first used by Trapper John McIntyre, when he is flirting with Margaret after learning about her affair with Frank Burns.

    Unbeknownst to them, a hidden PA microphone is broadcasting their conversation to the whole camp, including her growl to Frank, "kiss my hot lips".

    In the TV show, the origin of her nickname is never shown or explained in detail, though it seems to refer to various aspects of her passionate nature.

    Midway through the series, the "Hot Lips" nickname phases out, with characters addressing her as either Margaret or Major Houlihan, though her nickname is still referenced occasionally.

    For instance, in the sixth-season episode "Patent ", when Margaret is in a bad mood after losing her wedding ring, a nurse describes her as "Hot Lips Houlihan: Blonde land mine".

    Hot Lips! Early on in the TV series, she is a stern "by-the-book" head nurse, but willingly goes against regulations for her own gain.

    She uses her sex appeal to her professional advantage as well as personal satisfaction, as shown by her relationship with Frank Burns.

    In early seasons she had several liaisons with visiting colonels or generals who were "old friends". She is an experienced surgical nurse, so although she thoroughly disapproves of the surgeons' off-duty tomfoolery, she is able to set her personal feelings aside to appreciate their skills, such as when she came down with appendicitis and asked that Hawkeye, not Burns, perform the surgery if needed.

    In later years, she becomes a more relaxed and less criticizing member of the unit, tempering her authority with humanity. Key episodes in this development include the season 5 episode "The Nurses", in which she plays the role of a stern disciplinarian, but breaks down in front of her nurses revealing how hurt she is by their disdain for her; and "Comrades In Arms" season 6 , in which Hawkeye and Margaret make peace as they endure an artillery barrage together while lost in the wilderness, though they had also shown more mutual respect for one another before when they have to go help a front-line aid station in "Aid Station" season 3.

    Drinking problems appear to run in her family. She once told Frank that half of her salary went to support her mother; half of that money went towards drying her out, the other half for bail money her mother was a kleptomaniac.

    Her long-standing affair with Frank ends with her engagement and subsequent marriage to Lieutenant Colonel Donald Penobscott. The marriage does not last long; she later finds out a visiting nurse had had an affair with him.

    Though he promises to work things out with her, he has himself permanently transferred to San Francisco, and she divorces him, regaining her self-confidence.

    In the wake of her split with Burns, she becomes more comfortable with at least some of the unit's more unorthodox ways and as time progresses, becomes a willing participant in some of the hijinks.

    Despite their long-running mutual antagonism, Hawkeye and Margaret come to develop respect and affection for each other, reflected in a long passionate farewell kiss in the final episode.

    She returns to the US to take a position in an Army hospital. In the series of novels co-written with or ghost-written by William E.

    Butterworth, Houlihan reappears as the twice-widowed Margaret Houlihan Wachauf Wilson, both husbands having expired on the nuptial bed through excessive indulgence in her still-outstanding physical charms.

    Her career has taken a new direction as the head of the "God Is Love in All Forms Christian Church, Incorporated", a cult or sect with the unusual distinction that its entire congregation consists of gay men.

    Most of these are extremely flamboyant and the Reverend Mother herself is conspicuously glitzy and glittery.

    However, it appears that Margaret genuinely cares for her flock and is not merely shaking them down in pursuit of material gain.

    The name Charles Emerson Winchester was derived from three real street names in the city of Boston. Though Winchester did embody some antagonistic qualities similar to that of Burns, he proved over the course of his time on the series to be a very different character than his predecessor, being far more intelligent, humane, and kind.

    Charles Winchester was born in his grandmother's house in the Boston, Massachusetts , neighborhood of Beacon Hill , and is part of a wealthy family of Republican Boston Brahmins.

    After finishing his secondary studies at Choate , he graduated summa cum laude class of from Harvard College where he lettered in Crew and Polo , completed his MD at Harvard Medical in Boston in , and worked at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Keeping with the show's tradition of replacement characters who are in some way the antithesis of their predecessors, Winchester is as skilled a surgeon as Burns was inept—although he had to learn how to perform battlefield medicine a.

    Indeed, in one episode during a verbal joust with Pierce and Hunnicutt, Winchester is able to match them true story for true story due to his cultured upbringing and skill, culminating in him revealing he even once dated actress Audrey Hepburn producing a candid photograph of them as proof to the astonishment and chagrin of B.

    Although the character was originally intended to develop a romance with Houlihan, [ citation needed ] the chemistry between the two was not there, so Charles and Margaret maintain a platonic, professional friendship.

    Winchester is often adversarial with Hawkeye and B. He has a keen but dry sense of humor, and enjoys practical jokes as well as the occasional prank to get revenge on his bunkmates for something they did or for his own amusement.

    Behind his snobbery, he was raised with a sense of noblesse oblige and was capable of profound — albeit sometimes misguided — acts of kindness.

    For example, in "Death Takes a Holiday" he anonymously gifts an orphanage with expensive chocolates a tradition in his family.

    Initially outraged to find that they have been sold on the black market, he learns that the candies were sold to buy staple goods, as the orphanage director apologizes.

    Winchester reflects: "It is I who should be sorry. It is sadly inappropriate to give dessert to a child who has had no meal.

    In "Morale Victory", he sends for a copy of the score for Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand to give encouragement to a pianist who can no longer play with his injured right hand.

    In "Run for the Money", he stands up for a wounded soldier whose comrades and commanding officer mock his stuttering, encouraging the young man to live up to his intellectual potential.

    At the end of the episode, he listens to a recorded letter from his sister Honoria, who turns out to likewise be a stutterer. Classical music is one of his great loves, helping him to maintain his morale.

    In the series finale, following the sudden death of the Chinese POWs he has been teaching a work by Mozart , Winchester states that music has transformed into a haunting reminder of the horrors of the war.

    After the war, he returns to Boston where the position of Chief of Thoracic Surgery at a prestigious hospital awaits him. The character was portrayed by Gary Burghoff in both the film and on television, the only regular character played by a single actor.

    Robespierre O'Reilly. Radar is from Ottumwa, Iowa , and joined the army right out of high school. He seems to have extra-sensory perception , appearing at his commander's side before being called and finishing his sentences.

    He also has exceptionally good hearing, able to hear helicopters before anyone else, and to tell from the rotor sounds if they are coming in loaded or not.

    It was these abilities that earned him the nickname "Radar". The character is inspired by company clerk Don Shaffer, who also was born in Ottumwa and nicknamed "Radar" by his compatriots, and who served alongside Hornberger in Korea.

    In the film, Radar was portrayed as worldly and sneaky, a characterization that carried into the early part of the series.

    He carries with him a pocketful of passes for any potential scam that might arise, and has a racket of selling tickets for spying through a peephole into the nurses' shower.

    Another time, he cons nearly every member of MASH into buying mail order shoes. He is known for his tremendous appetite for heaping portions of food, is not averse to drinking Henry Blake's brandy and smoking his cigars when the colonel is off-duty, and he occasionally drinks the moonshine liquor that Hawkeye and Trapper make in their still.

    Soon after the pilot episode, Burghoff noted that the other characters were changing from the film portrayals and decided to follow.

    He has a virginal awkwardness with women, and a fondness for superhero comic books. He runs the camp public address system and radio station, which are often used in minor gags; in one episode he transmits messages to a Navy carrier by Morse code.

    Radar frequently looks to the doctors for advice, and increasingly regards Henry Blake and then Sherman Potter as father figures, having lost his own elderly father at a young age.

    Radar is also one of the very few people Hawkeye Pierce has ever saluted an event that occurred after Radar was wounded during a trip to Seoul and was given a Purple Heart and when he leaves to goo home , showing just how much Pierce respects him.

    Radar is promoted to Second Lieutenant as the result of a poker game debt "Lt. Radar O'Reilly" , but soon returns to Corporal after discovering that life as a commissioned officer is more complicated than he had originally thought.

    It was Radar who entered the operating room to announce that Colonel Blake's plane had been shot down over the Sea of Japan, with no survivors.

    Burghoff appeared in every episode of the show's first three seasons. After season three, doing the series had become a strain on the actor's family life, and he had his contract changed to limit his appearances to 13 episodes per season out of the usual By season seven, Burghoff started experiencing burnout and decided it was time to quit; he finished season seven, then returned the next season for a two-part farewell episode titled " Good-Bye Radar " in which Radar was granted a hardship discharge after the death of his Uncle Ed to help on the family farm, which he accepted after being satisfied that Klinger could replace him.

    He left his teddy bear behind on Hawkeye's bunk as a parting gift and symbol of his maturity. In that movie and proposed series, the O'Reilly family farm had failed and Radar had moved to St.

    Louis and become a police officer. Production never proceeded past the pilot, which aired once on CBS.

    He is a Catholic priest, and serves as a US Army chaplain assigned to the th. He was played by George Morgan in the pilot episode of the series, but the producers decided that a quirkier individual was needed for the role.

    In the novel and film, Mulcahy is familiarly known by the nickname "Dago Red", a derogatory reference to his Italian—Irish ancestry and the sacramental wine used during Holy Mass.

    While most of the staff is not religious, they treat Mulcahy with some respect. It is Mulcahy who alerts the doctors that the camp dentist "Painless" is severely depressed.

    Afterwards, Mulcahy reluctantly helps the doctors to stage the famous "Last Supper" faux suicide, to convince Painless that he should continue with life.

    He is bewildered by the doctors' amoral pranks and womanizing behavior, but is usually forgiving of their jokes and sarcastic remarks, commenting once that "humor, after all, was one of His creations".

    When Radar places a hidden microphone inside Hot Lips's tent as she and Frank Burns have sex, members of the camp listen in, and Mulcahy at first mistakes their conversation and noises for an episode of The Bickersons , leaving abruptly when he realizes otherwise.

    He is from Philadelphia and is frequently seen wearing a Loyola sweatshirt. He has a sibling, Kathy, who is a Catholic nun. His sister's religious name is Theresa.

    There is a running joke that Mulcahy always wins the betting pools. On one occasion, when asked how he knows what bet to place, he looks to the sky with a smile.

    His luck at poker is unremarkable, however. He donates his winnings to the local orphanage. Mulcahy understands that many of his "flock" are non-religious or have other faiths, and does not evangelize them overtly.

    Rather than lecturing from authority, he seeks to teach by example "Blood Brothers" , or by helping someone see the error of their ways "Identity Crisis".

    Although his quiet faith in God is unshakable, Mulcahy is often troubled over whether his role as chaplain and religious leader has importance compared to the doctors' obvious talent for saving lives.

    This is despite being told by Cardinal Reardon, a prelate visiting Korea to evaluate the effectiveness of the chaplains serving there, that "you're a tough act to follow".

    He is repeatedly passed over for promotion, but eventually rises to the rank of Captain after Colonel Potter intercedes on his behalf "Captains Outrageous".

    Although he is ordained as a Catholic priest, Mulcahy demonstrates a familiarity with other faiths, such as offering a prayer in Hebrew for a wounded Jewish soldier "Cowboy" and explaining the rituals of a Buddhist wedding to other attendees from the camp "Ping Pong".

    In the series finale, while releasing POWs from a holding pen in the path of an artillery barrage , he is nearly killed and loses most of his hearing when a shell explodes at close range.

    He tells his friends that he intends to work with the deaf following the war, but only B. An experimental procedure was said to have restored most of his hearing.

    Corporal later Sergeant Maxwell Q. As for Klinger's religion, in an early show, Klinger said he gave up being an atheist for Lent. The character's original defining characteristic was his continual attempts to gain a Section 8 psychiatric discharge from the Army, by habitually wearing women's clothing and engaging in other "crazy" stunts.

    His first appearance was in the fourth episode, " Chief Surgeon Who? When Colonel Potter takes command, Klinger immediately tries the same with him, but Potter sees through the scam immediately.

    In the second half of the two-part episode " Bug Out ", which inaugurated the fifth season, Klinger reveals that it took him three years to accumulate his collection of dresses, implying that he was cross dressing before the Korean War began.

    Klinger eventually gives up his attempts at a Section 8 when he is picked by Colonel Potter to become the company clerk following Radar's discharge.

    He is later promoted to Sergeant "Promotion Commotion" and begins to take his duties even more seriously; the writers had decided to "tap into his street skills" to flesh out his character.

    In the eighth-season episode "Dear Uncle Abdul", Klinger writes to his uncle — who successfully used cross-dressing to stay out of the Army — about the crazy goings-on in camp, ending with the reflection "It's no wonder I never got a Section Eight — there's nothing special about me; everybody here is crazy!

    In the third-season episode "Springtime", Klinger marries his girlfriend, Laverne Esposito, via radio. In season six, he receives a Dear John letter from Laverne saying she has found another man, whom she later breaks up with, then becoming engaged to Klinger's supposed best friend.

    When Colonel Potter denies his hardship authorization to go home to try to save his marriage, considering it another fake story, the frustrated Klinger tears his dress, shouting that his cross-dressing was fake.

    From then on, he wears his Army uniform, and has given up on his attempts to "escape". In the final episodes of the series, Klinger gets engaged to Soon Lee Han Rosalind Chao , a Korean refugee; when proposing to her, he suggests she wear the wedding dress he had himself worn in one of his attempted Section Eight escapades and explains to her what white means in his culture.

    She refuses to leave Korea until she finds her family, leading to the irony that although the end of the war means Klinger is free to return to the US, he chooses to stay with her.

    However, she faced racial discrimination and he turned to bookmaking , and is only able to escape prison time when Sherman Potter offers a character reference and hires him as his assistant at the veteran's hospital in Missouri where he now works.

    In the book Duke Forrest is described as under six feet tall, with red hair, blue eyes, and 29 years old.

    He is married with two daughters. As portrayed by Skerritt in the film, he stands at 6'1" and is dark-haired. Skerritt was 37 years old at the time.

    In both the novel and the film, he is a surgeon assigned to the th, who arrives with Hawkeye. In the film, when it is proposed that "Spearchucker" Jones will bunk with the other surgeons in the Swamp, Duke is disrespectful implied to be because of his own Southern heritage , until he is rebuked by Hawkeye and Trapper.

    Duke learns to appreciate Spearchucker when he is informed that he is a well-known professional football player, as well as when Duke sees Spearchucker's prowess as a surgeon.

    The Duke Forrest character did not make it to the TV series. Skerritt reportedly turned down the offer from 20th Century Fox to reprise his role as Duke on the series because he doubted that a half-hour sitcom adaptation of the film would succeed.

    Hammond is a brigadier general who is in charge of several medical outfits, including the th. In both the film and the TV series, Hammond is played by G.

    Wood , making him one of two actors to reprise his film role in the TV show. Gary Burghoff is the other. In the book, the character's full name is Hamilton Hartington Hammond, and he is stationed in Seoul.

    In the movie, General Hammond's first name is Charles, and he is very enthusiastic about football, challenging the th to a game against his th Evac unit.

    In the series pilot it is clear that he is a surgeon as well as an administrator, and his first name is Hamilton.

    In both the film and the series, Hammond has a cordial relationship with Col. In the film, Hammond is dismissive of Major Houlihan and her negative report about Blake, while in the TV series Houlihan is a sometime lover whom he remembers fondly.

    Clayton, like Hammond, is in charge of several medical outfits including the th. He once refers to Henry Blake as "a dear friend", though Blake always addresses him as "General.

    He is played by Herb Voland. A general who appears in a few early episodes. In the episode " The Incubator ", and in this episode only, he is presented as a fool, answering questions of reporters in military double talk.

    In " Officers Only ", he is the grateful father of a wounded soldier who arranges with Maj. Burns for the construction of an Officers Club.

    Played by Robert F. Flagg is an American intelligence agent who acts paranoid and irrational and appears to the staff of the th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital to be mentally unstable.

    Before playing Flagg, Winter played a similar character named Capt. Halloran in the episode "Deal Me Out". Flagg resurfaces a few years after the war, in a Hannibal, Missouri , courtroom as seen in the AfterMASH episode "Trials" , in which he uses the name Flagg and asserts employment with an intelligence organization "which has initials and its members are allowed to carry firearms in their shoes".

    Donald is introduced in name only at the start of the fifth season. She falls madly in love with him on the spot, and he quickly asks her to marry him.

    Margaret promptly accepts, leading to a falling out with her former flame Frank Burns. Penobscott is not actually seen until the season-ending episode "Margaret's Marriage", wherein Donald played by Carroll arrives to marry Margaret at the th.

    Hawkeye and B. The cast is still on during the wedding ceremony, and he is unable to move without assistance.

    The wedding is cut short by incoming wounded, which leaves Donald in the mess hall, unable to move in his body cast.

    As Margaret leaves for her honeymoon, they make a halfhearted attempt to tell her that the cast could be removed, but she doesn't hear them over the sound of the helicopter they are departing in.

    Frank Burns

    And the attack will be further strengthened by the imminent return from injury of All-Star full forward Cathal McShane.

    Decisive incidents meant all the difference in a contest of fine margins at Pairc MacCumhaill, and Donegal made more of their big moments.

    As the boots go into storage for a winter of undetermined duration, Burns has positive reflections on a season like no other. It gave you something to focus and work towards.

    Picture by Seamus Loughran. Picture by Margaret McLaughlin. In the TV series, Burns is a firm believer in military discipline and continues to fancy himself a superior surgeon, but his actions invariably reveal his incompetence and require one of the other surgeons to prevent him from making fatal mistakes.

    Though by military rank Burns is second-in-command of the unit, he is outranked in medical matters by Hawkeye, who reluctantly accepts appointment by Blake as Chief Surgeon.

    When Burns is left in command of the unit per military regulations , he generally micromanages camp operations, just for the sake of being in command, but demonstrates a profound lack of military competence as well.

    Burns and Hawkeye recount opposing versions of the events. Burns claims that he was performing superior work even going so far as to donate blood to a critically wounded soldier in between treating patients and performing the Last Rites benediction in Latin for the deceased after Father Mulcahy passed out from exhaustion.

    Burns further asserts that the other surgeons could not keep up with him and complained that he was pushing them too hard. In Hawkeye's presumably far more accurate account, Burns was borderline hysterical and performed his duties with signature incompetence, which resulted in the near-deaths of multiple casualties.

    After being confronted by Hawkeye, Burns was knocked unconscious by the operating room door. In an early episode, however, before his character becomes more of a buffoon, he demonstrates himself to be an efficient though, again, micromanaging commander.

    In addition to his gullibility, Burns was shown to be incredibly greedy, selfish, and occasionally childish; he is involved in a prescription kickback racket and falsifies his income taxes.

    He is also overly suspicious of Koreans, going as far as to claim that South Koreans are communist infiltrators and hustlers, and is openly racist against Native Americans although Colonel Potter, being part Cherokee, sternly puts a stop to that early on.

    Despite his ongoing affair with Major Houlihan, he is unwilling to divorce his wife because his money, stocks, and house are in her name.

    In one episode, " Major Fred C. Dobbs ", his greed is such that he turns down a transfer to another unit because he is tricked by Hawkeye and Trapper into thinking there is gold in the hills near the camp.

    Both medals are stolen by Hawkeye and given to people who earned them: an underage Marine played by Ron Howard and a Korean mother and her infant son who had been shot just before she gave birth.

    Burns's only friend in the unit is head nurse Major Margaret Houlihan, with whom he has an ongoing affair that they believe is discreet, but which is common knowledge in the camp.

    They share a disdain for the "un-military" doctors, against whom they conspire ineffectively. His wife eventually hears of the affair and threatens him with divorce; he denies it, describing Houlihan as an "old war horse" and an "army mule with bosoms", thus beginning a rift that leads to her engagement to Donald Penobscott, a handsome lieutenant colonel stationed in Tokyo.

    Following Houlihan's marriage in the fifth-season finale "Margaret's Marriage" also Larry Linville's last appearance on camera as Frank Burns , in the two-part sixth-season premiere episode "Fade Out, Fade In", which also introduces his temporary later permanent replacement, Major Charles Emerson Winchester III, the th learns that, shortly after the wedding, Burns suffered a mental breakdown while on a week's leave in Seoul.

    He accosts a female WAC , a female Red Cross worker, and an army general and his wife in a hot bath, mistaking the couple for the Penobscotts.

    He is transferred stateside for psychiatric evaluation, but although the th is delighted to be finally rid of him, Burns seems to have the last laugh.

    He later telephones and tells Hawkeye that he has been cleared of all charges, promoted to lieutenant colonel and assigned to a veteran's hospital in his hometown.

    Nothing else is known about the character's fate post show. Burns' departure from the series stemmed from Linville's frustration with the character, which he felt offered no further opportunities for development.

    She is the regular-army head nurse of the th, and begins allied with Major Frank Burns against the more civilian doctors of the unit.

    Later in the series, particularly after the departure of Burns, she becomes a more sympathetic character, softening her attitude while still serving as a foil for their antics.

    Margaret is an army brat , born in an Army base hospital, the daughter of career artillery officer Alvin "Howitzer Al" Houlihan. She entered nursing school in and graduated in when she joined the Army.

    She served in World War II but it is unknown if she served stateside or overseas. She is the head nurse of the th MASH, the highest-ranking female officer in the unit, and fiercely protective of the women under her command.

    Her nickname "Hot Lips" has different origins in the original novel, film, and TV show. In the novel, the phrase is first used by Trapper John McIntyre, when he is flirting with Margaret after learning about her affair with Frank Burns.

    Unbeknownst to them, a hidden PA microphone is broadcasting their conversation to the whole camp, including her growl to Frank, "kiss my hot lips".

    In the TV show, the origin of her nickname is never shown or explained in detail, though it seems to refer to various aspects of her passionate nature.

    Midway through the series, the "Hot Lips" nickname phases out, with characters addressing her as either Margaret or Major Houlihan, though her nickname is still referenced occasionally.

    For instance, in the sixth-season episode "Patent ", when Margaret is in a bad mood after losing her wedding ring, a nurse describes her as "Hot Lips Houlihan: Blonde land mine".

    Hot Lips! Early on in the TV series, she is a stern "by-the-book" head nurse, but willingly goes against regulations for her own gain. She uses her sex appeal to her professional advantage as well as personal satisfaction, as shown by her relationship with Frank Burns.

    In early seasons she had several liaisons with visiting colonels or generals who were "old friends". She is an experienced surgical nurse, so although she thoroughly disapproves of the surgeons' off-duty tomfoolery, she is able to set her personal feelings aside to appreciate their skills, such as when she came down with appendicitis and asked that Hawkeye, not Burns, perform the surgery if needed.

    In later years, she becomes a more relaxed and less criticizing member of the unit, tempering her authority with humanity. Key episodes in this development include the season 5 episode "The Nurses", in which she plays the role of a stern disciplinarian, but breaks down in front of her nurses revealing how hurt she is by their disdain for her; and "Comrades In Arms" season 6 , in which Hawkeye and Margaret make peace as they endure an artillery barrage together while lost in the wilderness, though they had also shown more mutual respect for one another before when they have to go help a front-line aid station in "Aid Station" season 3.

    Drinking problems appear to run in her family. She once told Frank that half of her salary went to support her mother; half of that money went towards drying her out, the other half for bail money her mother was a kleptomaniac.

    Her long-standing affair with Frank ends with her engagement and subsequent marriage to Lieutenant Colonel Donald Penobscott. The marriage does not last long; she later finds out a visiting nurse had had an affair with him.

    Though he promises to work things out with her, he has himself permanently transferred to San Francisco, and she divorces him, regaining her self-confidence.

    In the wake of her split with Burns, she becomes more comfortable with at least some of the unit's more unorthodox ways and as time progresses, becomes a willing participant in some of the hijinks.

    Despite their long-running mutual antagonism, Hawkeye and Margaret come to develop respect and affection for each other, reflected in a long passionate farewell kiss in the final episode.

    She returns to the US to take a position in an Army hospital. In the series of novels co-written with or ghost-written by William E.

    Butterworth, Houlihan reappears as the twice-widowed Margaret Houlihan Wachauf Wilson, both husbands having expired on the nuptial bed through excessive indulgence in her still-outstanding physical charms.

    Her career has taken a new direction as the head of the "God Is Love in All Forms Christian Church, Incorporated", a cult or sect with the unusual distinction that its entire congregation consists of gay men.

    Most of these are extremely flamboyant and the Reverend Mother herself is conspicuously glitzy and glittery. However, it appears that Margaret genuinely cares for her flock and is not merely shaking them down in pursuit of material gain.

    The name Charles Emerson Winchester was derived from three real street names in the city of Boston. Though Winchester did embody some antagonistic qualities similar to that of Burns, he proved over the course of his time on the series to be a very different character than his predecessor, being far more intelligent, humane, and kind.

    Charles Winchester was born in his grandmother's house in the Boston, Massachusetts , neighborhood of Beacon Hill , and is part of a wealthy family of Republican Boston Brahmins.

    After finishing his secondary studies at Choate , he graduated summa cum laude class of from Harvard College where he lettered in Crew and Polo , completed his MD at Harvard Medical in Boston in , and worked at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Keeping with the show's tradition of replacement characters who are in some way the antithesis of their predecessors, Winchester is as skilled a surgeon as Burns was inept—although he had to learn how to perform battlefield medicine a.

    Indeed, in one episode during a verbal joust with Pierce and Hunnicutt, Winchester is able to match them true story for true story due to his cultured upbringing and skill, culminating in him revealing he even once dated actress Audrey Hepburn producing a candid photograph of them as proof to the astonishment and chagrin of B.

    Although the character was originally intended to develop a romance with Houlihan, [ citation needed ] the chemistry between the two was not there, so Charles and Margaret maintain a platonic, professional friendship.

    Winchester is often adversarial with Hawkeye and B. He has a keen but dry sense of humor, and enjoys practical jokes as well as the occasional prank to get revenge on his bunkmates for something they did or for his own amusement.

    Behind his snobbery, he was raised with a sense of noblesse oblige and was capable of profound — albeit sometimes misguided — acts of kindness.

    For example, in "Death Takes a Holiday" he anonymously gifts an orphanage with expensive chocolates a tradition in his family. Initially outraged to find that they have been sold on the black market, he learns that the candies were sold to buy staple goods, as the orphanage director apologizes.

    Winchester reflects: "It is I who should be sorry. It is sadly inappropriate to give dessert to a child who has had no meal. In "Morale Victory", he sends for a copy of the score for Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand to give encouragement to a pianist who can no longer play with his injured right hand.

    In "Run for the Money", he stands up for a wounded soldier whose comrades and commanding officer mock his stuttering, encouraging the young man to live up to his intellectual potential.

    At the end of the episode, he listens to a recorded letter from his sister Honoria, who turns out to likewise be a stutterer.

    Classical music is one of his great loves, helping him to maintain his morale. In the series finale, following the sudden death of the Chinese POWs he has been teaching a work by Mozart , Winchester states that music has transformed into a haunting reminder of the horrors of the war.

    After the war, he returns to Boston where the position of Chief of Thoracic Surgery at a prestigious hospital awaits him. The character was portrayed by Gary Burghoff in both the film and on television, the only regular character played by a single actor.

    Robespierre O'Reilly. Radar is from Ottumwa, Iowa , and joined the army right out of high school. He seems to have extra-sensory perception , appearing at his commander's side before being called and finishing his sentences.

    He also has exceptionally good hearing, able to hear helicopters before anyone else, and to tell from the rotor sounds if they are coming in loaded or not.

    It was these abilities that earned him the nickname "Radar". The character is inspired by company clerk Don Shaffer, who also was born in Ottumwa and nicknamed "Radar" by his compatriots, and who served alongside Hornberger in Korea.

    In the film, Radar was portrayed as worldly and sneaky, a characterization that carried into the early part of the series.

    He carries with him a pocketful of passes for any potential scam that might arise, and has a racket of selling tickets for spying through a peephole into the nurses' shower.

    Another time, he cons nearly every member of MASH into buying mail order shoes. He is known for his tremendous appetite for heaping portions of food, is not averse to drinking Henry Blake's brandy and smoking his cigars when the colonel is off-duty, and he occasionally drinks the moonshine liquor that Hawkeye and Trapper make in their still.

    Soon after the pilot episode, Burghoff noted that the other characters were changing from the film portrayals and decided to follow.

    He has a virginal awkwardness with women, and a fondness for superhero comic books. He runs the camp public address system and radio station, which are often used in minor gags; in one episode he transmits messages to a Navy carrier by Morse code.

    Radar frequently looks to the doctors for advice, and increasingly regards Henry Blake and then Sherman Potter as father figures, having lost his own elderly father at a young age.

    Radar is also one of the very few people Hawkeye Pierce has ever saluted an event that occurred after Radar was wounded during a trip to Seoul and was given a Purple Heart and when he leaves to goo home , showing just how much Pierce respects him.

    Radar is promoted to Second Lieutenant as the result of a poker game debt "Lt. Radar O'Reilly" , but soon returns to Corporal after discovering that life as a commissioned officer is more complicated than he had originally thought.

    It was Radar who entered the operating room to announce that Colonel Blake's plane had been shot down over the Sea of Japan, with no survivors.

    Burghoff appeared in every episode of the show's first three seasons. After season three, doing the series had become a strain on the actor's family life, and he had his contract changed to limit his appearances to 13 episodes per season out of the usual By season seven, Burghoff started experiencing burnout and decided it was time to quit; he finished season seven, then returned the next season for a two-part farewell episode titled " Good-Bye Radar " in which Radar was granted a hardship discharge after the death of his Uncle Ed to help on the family farm, which he accepted after being satisfied that Klinger could replace him.

    He left his teddy bear behind on Hawkeye's bunk as a parting gift and symbol of his maturity. In that movie and proposed series, the O'Reilly family farm had failed and Radar had moved to St.

    Louis and become a police officer. Production never proceeded past the pilot, which aired once on CBS.

    He is a Catholic priest, and serves as a US Army chaplain assigned to the th. He was played by George Morgan in the pilot episode of the series, but the producers decided that a quirkier individual was needed for the role.

    In the novel and film, Mulcahy is familiarly known by the nickname "Dago Red", a derogatory reference to his Italian—Irish ancestry and the sacramental wine used during Holy Mass.

    While most of the staff is not religious, they treat Mulcahy with some respect. It is Mulcahy who alerts the doctors that the camp dentist "Painless" is severely depressed.

    Afterwards, Mulcahy reluctantly helps the doctors to stage the famous "Last Supper" faux suicide, to convince Painless that he should continue with life.

    He is bewildered by the doctors' amoral pranks and womanizing behavior, but is usually forgiving of their jokes and sarcastic remarks, commenting once that "humor, after all, was one of His creations".

    When Radar places a hidden microphone inside Hot Lips's tent as she and Frank Burns have sex, members of the camp listen in, and Mulcahy at first mistakes their conversation and noises for an episode of The Bickersons , leaving abruptly when he realizes otherwise.

    He is from Philadelphia and is frequently seen wearing a Loyola sweatshirt. He has a sibling, Kathy, who is a Catholic nun.

    His sister's religious name is Theresa. There is a running joke that Mulcahy always wins the betting pools. On one occasion, when asked how he knows what bet to place, he looks to the sky with a smile.

    His luck at poker is unremarkable, however. He donates his winnings to the local orphanage. Mulcahy understands that many of his "flock" are non-religious or have other faiths, and does not evangelize them overtly.

    Rather than lecturing from authority, he seeks to teach by example "Blood Brothers" , or by helping someone see the error of their ways "Identity Crisis".

    Although his quiet faith in God is unshakable, Mulcahy is often troubled over whether his role as chaplain and religious leader has importance compared to the doctors' obvious talent for saving lives.

    This is despite being told by Cardinal Reardon, a prelate visiting Korea to evaluate the effectiveness of the chaplains serving there, that "you're a tough act to follow".

    He is repeatedly passed over for promotion, but eventually rises to the rank of Captain after Colonel Potter intercedes on his behalf "Captains Outrageous".

    Although he is ordained as a Catholic priest, Mulcahy demonstrates a familiarity with other faiths, such as offering a prayer in Hebrew for a wounded Jewish soldier "Cowboy" and explaining the rituals of a Buddhist wedding to other attendees from the camp "Ping Pong".

    In the series finale, while releasing POWs from a holding pen in the path of an artillery barrage , he is nearly killed and loses most of his hearing when a shell explodes at close range.

    He tells his friends that he intends to work with the deaf following the war, but only B. An experimental procedure was said to have restored most of his hearing.

    Corporal later Sergeant Maxwell Q. As for Klinger's religion, in an early show, Klinger said he gave up being an atheist for Lent.

    The character's original defining characteristic was his continual attempts to gain a Section 8 psychiatric discharge from the Army, by habitually wearing women's clothing and engaging in other "crazy" stunts.

    His first appearance was in the fourth episode, " Chief Surgeon Who? When Colonel Potter takes command, Klinger immediately tries the same with him, but Potter sees through the scam immediately.

    In the second half of the two-part episode " Bug Out ", which inaugurated the fifth season, Klinger reveals that it took him three years to accumulate his collection of dresses, implying that he was cross dressing before the Korean War began.

    Klinger eventually gives up his attempts at a Section 8 when he is picked by Colonel Potter to become the company clerk following Radar's discharge.

    He is later promoted to Sergeant "Promotion Commotion" and begins to take his duties even more seriously; the writers had decided to "tap into his street skills" to flesh out his character.

    In the eighth-season episode "Dear Uncle Abdul", Klinger writes to his uncle — who successfully used cross-dressing to stay out of the Army — about the crazy goings-on in camp, ending with the reflection "It's no wonder I never got a Section Eight — there's nothing special about me; everybody here is crazy!

    In the third-season episode "Springtime", Klinger marries his girlfriend, Laverne Esposito, via radio. In season six, he receives a Dear John letter from Laverne saying she has found another man, whom she later breaks up with, then becoming engaged to Klinger's supposed best friend.

    When Colonel Potter denies his hardship authorization to go home to try to save his marriage, considering it another fake story, the frustrated Klinger tears his dress, shouting that his cross-dressing was fake.

    From then on, he wears his Army uniform, and has given up on his attempts to "escape". In the final episodes of the series, Klinger gets engaged to Soon Lee Han Rosalind Chao , a Korean refugee; when proposing to her, he suggests she wear the wedding dress he had himself worn in one of his attempted Section Eight escapades and explains to her what white means in his culture.

    She refuses to leave Korea until she finds her family, leading to the irony that although the end of the war means Klinger is free to return to the US, he chooses to stay with her.

    However, she faced racial discrimination and he turned to bookmaking , and is only able to escape prison time when Sherman Potter offers a character reference and hires him as his assistant at the veteran's hospital in Missouri where he now works.

    In the book Duke Forrest is described as under six feet tall, with red hair, blue eyes, and 29 years old. He is married with two daughters.

    As portrayed by Skerritt in the film, he stands at 6'1" and is dark-haired. Skerritt was 37 years old at the time. In both the novel and the film, he is a surgeon assigned to the th, who arrives with Hawkeye.

    In the film, when it is proposed that "Spearchucker" Jones will bunk with the other surgeons in the Swamp, Duke is disrespectful implied to be because of his own Southern heritage , until he is rebuked by Hawkeye and Trapper.

    Duke learns to appreciate Spearchucker when he is informed that he is a well-known professional football player, as well as when Duke sees Spearchucker's prowess as a surgeon.

    The Duke Forrest character did not make it to the TV series. Skerritt reportedly turned down the offer from 20th Century Fox to reprise his role as Duke on the series because he doubted that a half-hour sitcom adaptation of the film would succeed.

    Hammond is a brigadier general who is in charge of several medical outfits, including the th. In both the film and the TV series, Hammond is played by G.

    Wood , making him one of two actors to reprise his film role in the TV show. Gary Burghoff is the other. In the book, the character's full name is Hamilton Hartington Hammond, and he is stationed in Seoul.

    In the movie, General Hammond's first name is Charles, and he is very enthusiastic about football, challenging the th to a game against his th Evac unit.

    In the series pilot it is clear that he is a surgeon as well as an administrator, and his first name is Hamilton. In both the film and the series, Hammond has a cordial relationship with Col.

    In the film, Hammond is dismissive of Major Houlihan and her negative report about Blake, while in the TV series Houlihan is a sometime lover whom he remembers fondly.

    Clayton, like Hammond, is in charge of several medical outfits including the th. He once refers to Henry Blake as "a dear friend", though Blake always addresses him as "General.

    He is played by Herb Voland. A general who appears in a few early episodes. In the episode " The Incubator ", and in this episode only, he is presented as a fool, answering questions of reporters in military double talk.

    In " Officers Only ", he is the grateful father of a wounded soldier who arranges with Maj. Burns for the construction of an Officers Club.

    Played by Robert F. Flagg is an American intelligence agent who acts paranoid and irrational and appears to the staff of the th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital to be mentally unstable.

    Before playing Flagg, Winter played a similar character named Capt. Halloran in the episode "Deal Me Out". Flagg resurfaces a few years after the war, in a Hannibal, Missouri , courtroom as seen in the AfterMASH episode "Trials" , in which he uses the name Flagg and asserts employment with an intelligence organization "which has initials and its members are allowed to carry firearms in their shoes".

    Donald is introduced in name only at the start of the fifth season. She falls madly in love with him on the spot, and he quickly asks her to marry him.

    Margaret promptly accepts, leading to a falling out with her former flame Frank Burns. Penobscott is not actually seen until the season-ending episode "Margaret's Marriage", wherein Donald played by Carroll arrives to marry Margaret at the th.

    April 11, The New York Times. Retrieved April 21, Chicago Tribune. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history.

    Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version.

    Wikimedia Commons. Earth Girls Are Easy. Rock 'n' Roll High School Forever. The Doctors. Judd, for the Defense. The Outsider. Mission: Impossible.

    Here Come the Brides. The Night Stalker. O'Hara, U. The Sixth Sense. Frank Burns. Kolchak: The Night Stalker. Grandpa Goes to Washington. Herbie, the Love Bug.

    Detective in the House.

    Frank Burns Inhaltsverzeichnis

    Er war von allen geachtet und bewundert. Marion Burns Pancho Villa Reitet Major, Einstein Serien Stream dann befördert zum Lt. Eberhard Prüter Ep. Er kann zum Beispiel anfliegende Hubschrauber mit Verletzten schon melden, lange bevor sie von Umstehenden wahrgenommen oder Dmax Videotheke Funksprüche angekündigt werden. Alle Kategorien. Bei den Nomad Players wurde er Ganztags-Schauspieler. Staffel Lieutenant Colonel Donald Satansbraten Film heiratet. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. OjaiKalifornien. Das letzte Schaf Hub, Ulrich. McLean Fantastic Four 2005 Stream Deutsch ; liebenswerter, vertrottelter Vorgesetzter und Kommandeur des Lagers, ist für eine leitende Funktion nicht geschaffen. Er ist Pazifist, ein genialer Chirurg, Pokerspieler und Frauenheld. Ellen Sandweiss ein einziges Wort Walsh, Rosie. Eberhard Prüter Ep. Als er Margaret Houlihan verleumden soll, um seinen ehemaligen Vorgesetzten Colonel Baldwin zu decken, der ihn dafür wieder nach Tokio versetzen würde, entscheidet er sich jedoch dagegen und bleibt im Camp.

    Frank Burns Categories Video

    MASH Change of Command

    Frank Burns - Janssen Bücher

    Seine Versuche werden aber meist sofort durchschaut. Staffel nach Hause geschickt. Frank Burns In seiner Studienzeit begann er in der Theatergruppe 'Nomad Players' zu Sport 1 Moderatorin. Larry unterschrieb, wie die meisten anderen Hauptdarsteller auch einen Fünf-Jahresvertrag. Larry Linville schaffte es nicht mehr, seine Krankheit zu besiegen. Manfred Lehmann Lothar Hinze. Er wurde zunächst als Uwe Abel Vertretung für Major Burns in das ste geschickt, dann aber auf Dauer ins Lager versetzt, weil er gegen seinen Vorgesetzten Colonel Baldwin beim Kartenspiel gewonnen und darauf bestanden hatte, seinen Gewinn The Mechanic Resurrection kassieren. Auch erfindet er ständig neue Ausreden wie Araber oder Shades Of Grey Kinox als Vorfahren oder religiöse Gründe, weshalb er dringend nach Hause muss. Johnny Mandel. Im Verlauf der Serie kommt es aber immer mehr zu zutiefst emotionalen Momenten auch zu seinen direkten Kollegen, die er nicht mehr nur dazu ausnutzt, um bei einer Frau zu landen. As a surgeon, he does not like the use of firearms The Killer Inside Stream he refuses to carry a sidearm as required by regulations when serving as Officer of the Day. He is also sometimes tasked Starship Troopers Stream Deutsch duties with Radar, Tambien La Lluvia Stream seen in the episode "Mulcahy's War". Being of the same rank as Hawkeye in the novel, Blake tries to make sure neither is on duty at the same time, but cannot do so when things Fast And Furious 6 Movie4k busy. Archived from the original on July 30, Igor became a fan favorite with both the fan base and the network.

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    2 Kommentare

    • Daigul

      Entschuldigen Sie, was ich jetzt in die Diskussionen nicht teilnehmen kann - es gibt keine freie Zeit. Ich werde befreit werden - unbedingt werde ich die Meinung in dieser Frage aussprechen.

    Eine Antwort schreiben

    Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.